Anti-Crime Unit

Since spring of 2004, Trotwood's Anti-Crime Unit has been using an innovative, problem-oriented approach to community-based policing called S.A.R.A. (scanning, analysis, response, and assessment). Based on the national model developed in Newport News, Virginia, S.A.R.A. requires all uniformed officers to use their uncommitted time to look for and solve existing beat problems.

This policing method includes:

  • Determining where the troubled areas are
  • Developing a plan for how to deal with those areas and problems
  • Putting that plan into effect
  • Seeing if that action plan corrected the problem
  • S.A.R.A.'s purpose is to empower residents by giving them a direct link to the city's Anti-Crime Unit
Crime categories positively impacted include:

  • Noise ordinance violations and similar neighborhood-based problems
  • Residential traffic complaints
  • Street level drug trafficking

The Trotwood Police Department is committed to prevent suspicious activity that may be related to terrorism, by working cooperatively with Local, State and Federal law enforcement agencies. This will be accomplished through individuals and community organizations, both public and private.

What is Suspicious Activity?

Suspicious Activity is any observed behavior that could indicate terrorism or terrorism-related crime. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Unusual items or situations: A vehicle is parked in an odd location, a package/luggage is unattended, a window/door is open that is usually closed, or other out-of-the-ordinary situations occur.

  • Eliciting information: A person questions individuals at a level beyond curiosity about a building’s purpose, operations, security procedures and/or personnel, shift changes, etc.

  • Observation/surveillance: Someone pays unusual attention to facilities or buildings beyond a casual or professional interest. This includes extended loitering without explanation (particularly in concealed locations); unusual, repeated, and/or prolonged observation of a building (e.g., with binoculars or video camera); taking notes or measurements; counting paces; sketching floor plans, etc.

Some of these activities could be innocent—it's up to law enforcement to determine whether the behavior warrants investigation.

How to Report Suspicious Activity

Public safety is everyone's responsibility. If you see suspicious activity or spot an emergency, please call 911.  Otherwise, residents can call in reports of illegal activity by calling our 24-hour Regional Dispatch Center at 937-837-7777 or 937-225-HELP(4357). 

Describe specifically what you observed, including:

  • Who or what you saw;
  • When you saw it;
  • Where it occurred; and
  • Why it's suspicious.

For more information on Homeland Security initiatives, please visit www.dhs.gov.